Doubting Thomas

John 2028 [widescreen]

Reading the Word

John 20:24–29 (ESV)

24 Now Thomas, one of the twelve, called the Twin, was not with them when Jesus came. 25 So the other disciples told him, “We have seen the Lord.” But he said to them, “Unless I see in his hands the mark of the nails, and place my finger into the mark of the nails, and place my hand into his side, I will never believe.”

26 Eight days later, his disciples were inside again, and Thomas was with them. Although the doors were locked, Jesus came and stood among them and said, “Peace be with you.” 27 Then he said to Thomas, “Put your finger here, and see my hands; and put out your hand, and place it in my side. Do not disbelieve, but believe.” 28 Thomas answered him, “My Lord and my God!” 29 Jesus said to him, “Have you believed because you have seen me? Blessed are those who have not seen and yet have believed.”

Understanding and Applying the Word

Today’s reading is the origin of the phrase “doubting Thomas”. When the other disciples told Thomas that they had seen the resurrected Jesus, he did not rush to believe them. In fact, he did not believe and said he would not unless he saw Jesus with his own eyes. Eight days later, Thomas did see Jesus with his own eyes and cried out, “My Lord and my God!” Thomas not only knew that Jesus had risen, but knew fully what the implications of such a truth meant. Jesus was God in the flesh!

Who was Jesus? That is a question that many struggle to answer. However, when we accept the accounts of the Gospels as true, the question is quickly answered. Jesus is the Lord, just as he claimed to be. And if that is true, we have the answer to our biggest questions about life and its meaning.

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