Contrasting Views of Jesus

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Reading the Word

John 7:10–13 (ESV)

10 But after his brothers had gone up to the feast, then he also went up, not publicly but in private. 11 The Jews were looking for him at the feast, and saying, “Where is he?” 12 And there was much muttering about him among the people. While some said, “He is a good man,” others said, “No, he is leading the people astray.” 13 Yet for fear of the Jews no one spoke openly of him.

Understanding and Applying the Word

After Jesus’ conversation with his brothers in verses 1-9, we are told that his brothers went up to the Feast of Booths without Jesus. However, Jesus did also go, but he did so secretly. His popularity must have made him a focus of conversation at the feast. The people were looking for him and there were competing opinions on who Jesus was. Some said the he was a “good man” while others said “he is leading the people astray.” The people were afraid to speak openly of him because the Jews (i.e. the Jewish religious leaders) were set on killing Jesus (cf. John 7:1).

If you were to take a poll today and ask people what they think of Jesus, you would probably get many answers, but the majority of the answers would likely fit into one of two categories: those who say Jesus is a “good man” and those who say “he has led people astray.” There really is not much middle ground on Jesus. He is as polarizing today as he was in the first century. And we are left to answer the same questions that people have been answering since he walked on this earth. Who is Jesus and what will we do with him?

How would you answer?

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Your Time Is Here

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Reading the Word

John 7:1–9 (ESV)

1 After this Jesus went about in Galilee. He would not go about in Judea, because the Jews were seeking to kill him. 2 Now the Jews’ Feast of Booths was at hand. 3 So his brothers said to him, “Leave here and go to Judea, that your disciples also may see the works you are doing. 4 For no one works in secret if he seeks to be known openly. If you do these things, show yourself to the world.” 5 For not even his brothers believed in him. 6 Jesus said to them, “My time has not yet come, but your time is always here. 7 The world cannot hate you, but it hates me because I testify about it that its works are evil. 8 You go up to the feast. I am not going up to this feast, for my time has not yet fully come.” 9 After saying this, he remained in Galilee.

Understanding and Applying the Word

We read that it was the time of the Feast of Booths and Jesus was ministering in Galilee because those in Judea were seeking to kill him. Jesus’ brothers wanted Jesus to go to Judea to attend the feast. His brothers had witnessed some of his miraculous works, but they did not believe that Jesus was the Messiah (cf. Mark 3:21, 31-35). They did not come to belief until after the resurrection (1 Corinthians 15:7; Acts 1:14). His brothers included James, Joseph, Simon, and Judas (i.e. Jude; cf. Matthew 13:55). James and Jude would later write the New Testament books that bear their names.

According to verses 3-4, Jesus’ brothers wanted him to go to Judea to display his signs and wonders more openly, but Jesus told them that it was not yet time for such displays. He went on to tell them that while it was not time for him to show himself to the world, their time had come and was always present.

What did Jesus mean by his statements to his brothers? They had seen Jesus. They knew him. They had grown up with him. They had witnessed some of his miracles. Jesus was telling them that they could believe in him. They had no need to wait. We too must make a decision on who Jesus is and today is the day. We should not think we will make a decision in the future. The question of Jesus’ true identity is too important to put off. 2 Corinthians 6:2 tells us, “Now is the day of salvation.” Will you believe in him? Will you tell others about him?

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Who Is Jesus?

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Reading the Word

Matthew 16:13–20 (ESV)

13 Now when Jesus came into the district of Caesarea Philippi, he asked his disciples, “Who do people say that the Son of Man is?” 14 And they said, “Some say John the Baptist, others say Elijah, and others Jeremiah or one of the prophets.” 15 He said to them, “But who do you say that I am?” 16 Simon Peter replied, “You are the Christ, the Son of the living God.” 17 And Jesus answered him, “Blessed are you, Simon Bar-Jonah! For flesh and blood has not revealed this to you, but my Father who is in heaven. 18 And I tell you, you are Peter, and on this rock I will build my church, and the gates of hell shall not prevail against it. 19 I will give you the keys of the kingdom of heaven, and whatever you bind on earth shall be bound in heaven, and whatever you loose on earth shall be loosed in heaven.” 20 Then he strictly charged the disciples to tell no one that he was the Christ.

Parallel Texts: Mark 8:27-30; Luke 9:18-21

Understanding and Applying the Word

Who is Jesus? That’s an important question and it’s the question Jesus put to his disciples. First, he asked the disciples what the people were saying about him. It seems that the people were convinced Jesus was some sort of prophet, but they were unsure of exactly which prophet. Perhaps he was one of the great prophets from the Old Testament come back to life?

After Jesus’ initial question about what the people were saying, he asked his disciples who they thought Jesus was. Peter replied, “You are the Christ (i.e. Messiah), the Son of the living God.” With this statement, Peter affirmed his belief that Jesus was the long-awaited Messiah from the line of David who would deliver and save his people. Jesus responded to Peter by calling him “blessed” because no person (i.e. flesh and blood) had revealed this truth to Peter, it had been revealed by God. This truly was a divine blessing!

Today, every person must answer the same question posed to the disciples. Who is Jesus? There are many responses to this question. Some say Jesus was a great teacher, others say he was simply a man that legend has inflated through the years, and still others try to say he did not exist at all (even the overwhelming majority of secular scholars admit that Jesus really existed). However, there are some today that echo the words of Peter. Jesus is the Christ, the Son of the living God. He came to save his people and deliver them and he did just that by going to a cross and dying as a sacrifice for sins. Jesus’ resurrection on the third day authenticated who he was and his life, death, and resurrection give hope to all who recognize him and trust in his name.

We are entering into the Easter season over the next two weeks where Christians remember the death of Jesus on the cross and celebrate his resurrection. There is no better time than now to ask this question: Who do you say Jesus is? It is the most important question you will ever answer. You owe it to yourself to seek out the answer and pray that God would open your eyes to the truth.

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