You Know My Reproach

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Reading the Word

Psalm 69:19–21 (ESV)

19 You know my reproach, and my shame and my dishonor; my foes are all known to you. 20 Reproaches have broken my heart, so that I am in despair. I looked for pity, but there was none, and for comforters, but I found none. 21 They gave me poison for food, and for my thirst they gave me sour wine to drink.

Understanding and Applying the Word

When we read these words of David, we may at first find them discouraging. David speaks of the pain and suffering he was facing as well as the lack of anyone to give him comfort or support. However, notice how he begins verse 19: “You know my reproach.” David knew he was not truly alone. God knew what he was going through.

These words also remind us of our Savior as he hung on the cross at Calvary. He too was mocked and ridiculed. He was abandoned by his friends. And He was given sour wine to drink. God Himself felt the same things that David felt.

Jesus walked in our shoes. He has felt the pain of this world. He has been mocked and ridiculed. He has been lied to. He has been treated unfairly. He knows what it is like to be abandoned and alone. God knows our pain, not just from afar, but because He became man. He truly knows our reproach. Because of this truth, we can be assured of His love for us and we can go to Him in our times of trouble. Let us find encouragement in David’s words and in the cross of our Lord.

**Shaped by the Word is a daily Bible reading devotional. Please use the links at the bottom to subscribe to this page. You can also share this post with your friends through social media using the buttons below. Thanks for reading!

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For Your Sake

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Reading the Word

Psalm 69:7–12 (ESV)

7 For it is for your sake that I have borne reproach, that dishonor has covered my face. 8 I have become a stranger to my brothers, an alien to my mother’s sons. 9 For zeal for your house has consumed me, and the reproaches of those who reproach you have fallen on me. 10 When I wept and humbled my soul with fasting, it became my reproach. 11 When I made sackcloth my clothing, I became a byword to them. 12 I am the talk of those who sit in the gate, and the drunkards make songs about me.

Understanding and Applying the Word

As David continues to call out to God he states that it his devotion to God that has caused him trouble. He has faced social rejection and even his family has turned on him. David is committed to God. He says that he is zealous for Him, but his zeal has been met with resistance from others.

We live in a world not unlike David’s. Those who desire to follow Christ with all of their hearts are often mocked and ridiculed as being ignorant and naive by unbelievers. We are not really surprised by this, but we are surprised that even among fellow believers, those who show too much zeal are often criticized as being too serious or being too religious.

As we live our lives for Christ, we must keep in mind the words He spoke to His disciples:

“If the world hates you, know that it has hated me before it hated you.” (John 15:18, ESV)

Let us seek God’s glory in all that we do even if the world turns against us for it!

**Shaped by the Word is a daily Bible reading devotional. Please use the links at the bottom to subscribe to this page. You can also share this post with your friends through social media using the buttons below. Thanks for reading!

Suffering for Your Sake, O God

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Reading the Word

Psalm 44:17–26 (ESV)

17 All this has come upon us, though we have not forgotten you, and we have not been false to your covenant. 18 Our heart has not turned back, nor have our steps departed from your way; 19 yet you have broken us in the place of jackals and covered us with the shadow of death. 20 If we had forgotten the name of our God or spread out our hands to a foreign god, 21 would not God discover this? For he knows the secrets of the heart. 22 Yet for your sake we are killed all the day long; we are regarded as sheep to be slaughtered. 23 Awake! Why are you sleeping, O Lord? Rouse yourself! Do not reject us forever! 24 Why do you hide your face? Why do you forget our affliction and oppression? 25 For our soul is bowed down to the dust; our belly clings to the ground. 26 Rise up; come to our help! Redeem us for the sake of your steadfast love!

Understanding and Applying the Word

We have been reading this psalm for a couple of days. In the previous verses we read the words of one crying out to God for help, but God has not done anything. Now we read that, even through all of the difficulties, the people have been faithful towards God (v. 17). They continue to live their lives for him.

Interestingly, we are told that the suffering that is taking place is “for your sake” (v.22). The people are suffering precisely because they are God’s people. This passage is quoted in Romans 8:36-39 by the apostle Paul who uses it to speak of his suffering for belonging to Christ and proclaiming the gospel.

The people of God in every age can expect rejection. In some places and times they can also expect severe persecution. Why? Because, as the people of God, they walk as witnesses to the truth to a world that has rejected the truth for a lie. When believers suffer for the sake of the truth of God’s word, they suffer for God’s sake. He may not come to our immediate rescue, but we can do the same thing that the writer of this psalm did. We can trust in the steadfast love of God (v.26). After all, he is the one who has redeemed us by sending his Son to die on a cross. He has shown us his love and we can trust him in every circumstance.

**Shaped by the Word is a daily Bible reading devotional. Please use the links at the bottom to subscribe to this page. You can also share this post with your friends through social media using the buttons below. Thanks for reading!