Kiss the Son

Psalms

Reading the Word

Psalm 2:5–12 (ESV)

5 Then he will speak to them in his wrath, and terrify them in his fury, saying, 6 “As for me, I have set my King on Zion, my holy hill.” 7 I will tell of the decree: The Lord said to me, “You are my Son; today I have begotten you. 8 Ask of me, and I will make the nations your heritage, and the ends of the earth your possession. 9 You shall break them with a rod of iron and dash them in pieces like a potter’s vessel.” 10 Now therefore, O kings, be wise; be warned, O rulers of the earth. 11 Serve the Lord with fear, and rejoice with trembling. 12 Kiss the Son, lest he be angry, and you perish in the way, for his wrath is quickly kindled. Blessed are all who take refuge in him.

Understanding and Applying the Word

God’s answer to the rebellion of the nations found in the opening verses of this psalm is his wrath. God will pour out judgment on his enemies and he will do so through his appointed King, Jesus Christ, who will rule over the nations.

Let this warning serve to motivate us to restore our relationship with God while we still can. We do this through the Son who, as we learn elsewhere, is not only our King, but our Savior. Jesus went to the cross at Calvary to die for the sins of mankind. He took the wrath of God on himself so that those who would trust in him could be forgiven and go free. Let us “kiss the Son” by trusting in him and accepting the free gift of reconciliation and life that he offers.

**Shaped by the Word is a daily Bible reading devotional. Please use the links at the bottom to subscribe to this page. You can also share this post with your friends through social media using the buttons below. Thanks for reading!

Advertisements

The Nations Rage

Psalms

Reading the Word

Psalm 2:1–4 (ESV)

1 Why do the nations rage and the peoples plot in vain? 2 The kings of the earth set themselves, and the rulers take counsel together, against the Lord and against his Anointed, saying, 3 “Let us burst their bonds apart and cast away their cords from us.” 4 He who sits in the heavens laughs; the Lord holds them in derision.

Understanding and Applying the Word

This psalm is classified as a royal psalm because its central focus is on the kingship. This psalm was used for the coronation of Israel’s kings who had descended from David. It has traditionally also been classified as a Messianic psalm because it was thought to speak not only of the line of David generally, but specifically of the promised Messiah from the line of David (i.e. Jesus Christ).

These opening verses describe the world as violently resisting the reign of God and his chosen King. The people see God’s rule as oppressive as they seek to break away to freedom. This stands as an interesting contrast to Psalm 1 that tells us that it is God’s word which gives abundant life.

Rage and rebel as they might, God stands as the sovereign one over the affairs of mankind. He is and always will be the ruler of his creation. Believers can find hope and encouragement that even though the world rejects our God and King, his kingdom is without end and his plans will never fail!

**Shaped by the Word is a daily Bible reading devotional. Please use the links at the bottom to subscribe to this page. You can also share this post with your friends through social media using the buttons below. Thanks for reading!