Set Your Mind on the Things of God

Get Thee Behind Me Satan

Get Thee behind Me Satan (Public Domain)

Reading the Word

Matthew 16:21–23 (ESV)

21 From that time Jesus began to show his disciples that he must go to Jerusalem and suffer many things from the elders and chief priests and scribes, and be killed, and on the third day be raised. 22 And Peter took him aside and began to rebuke him, saying, “Far be it from you, Lord! This shall never happen to you.” 23 But he turned and said to Peter, “Get behind me, Satan! You are a hindrance to me. For you are not setting your mind on the things of God, but on the things of man.”

Parallel Text: Mark 8:31-33

Understanding and Applying the Word

After Peter’s proclamation that Jesus was the long-promised Messiah that the Jewish people had been waiting for in the previous verses (see yesterday’s post), Jesus began to teach the disciples that he had to go to Jerusalem and be killed. This was surprising news to Jesus’ followers because this is not what they expected when the Messiah came. They expected he would establish the nation of Israel as a great power, throw off the bonds of Rome, and restore Israel to a place of prominence like it enjoyed under the reign of King David. How could Jesus, the Messiah, need to go to Jerusalem to die?

When Peter heard these words from Jesus, he spoke up and declared that this would never happen to Jesus! Peter surely believed he would defend and protect Jesus from such a thing. He must have been quite surprised at Jesus’ words: “Get behind me, Satan! You are a hindrance to me. For you are not setting your mind on the things of God, but on the things of man.” Why did Jesus respond to Peter in this manner?

Jesus’ words to Peter were pointed, but they were designed to drive home a point to Peter and the disciples. Jesus wanted them to understand that submission to the plans and purposes of God is the most important thing, even if it means death. Peter was only concerned with the fulfillment of his personal desires. Jesus was concerned with doing the will of the Father. God was bringing salvation to mankind through the suffering and death of Jesus.

Are we ready and willing to submit to the will of God in our own lives? What if that means we have to move out of our comfort zones? What if it means suffering? What if it means loss of freedom or even loss of life? Do we trust in the plans and purposes of God enough to lay aside our own desires for his?

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Walking on Water

Matthew 1429 [widescreen]

Reading the Word

Matthew 14:22–33 (ESV)

22 Immediately he made the disciples get into the boat and go before him to the other side, while he dismissed the crowds. 23 And after he had dismissed the crowds, he went up on the mountain by himself to pray. When evening came, he was there alone, 24 but the boat by this time was a long way from the land, beaten by the waves, for the wind was against them. 25 And in the fourth watch of the night he came to them, walking on the sea. 26 But when the disciples saw him walking on the sea, they were terrified, and said, “It is a ghost!” and they cried out in fear. 27 But immediately Jesus spoke to them, saying, “Take heart; it is I. Do not be afraid.”

28 And Peter answered him, “Lord, if it is you, command me to come to you on the water.” 29 He said, “Come.” So Peter got out of the boat and walked on the water and came to Jesus. 30 But when he saw the wind, he was afraid, and beginning to sink he cried out, “Lord, save me.” 31 Jesus immediately reached out his hand and took hold of him, saying to him, “O you of little faith, why did you doubt?” 32 And when they got into the boat, the wind ceased. 33 And those in the boat worshiped him, saying, “Truly you are the Son of God.”

Parallel Texts: Mark 6:45-52; John 6:14-21

Understanding and Applying the Word

Imagine being in a boat and seeing Jesus coming out to meet you. You are out in the deep water away from the shoreline, yet Jesus is walking towards you on the water! How would you respond? It is common for readers to think little of Peter as he got out of the boat to walk to Jesus and then quickly began to sink, but how many of us would have even gotten out of the boat at all? Probably not many of us!

Peter reminds us of ourselves. He was eager to go to Jesus and was very trusting. Then reality hit him. He noticed the wind and the waves and began to lose heart and panic. We too are eager to live for Jesus, but then difficulty and temptation come before us and we are soon fighting and struggling in our own strength and forgetting that Jesus is there with us. It is Jesus who is our true source of help and strength. May we never forget his promise that he would never leave or forsake us (Matthew 28:20), even when the seas get rough.

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Called to Serve

The Healing of Peter's Mother-in-law

The Healing of Peter’s Mother-in-Law (Public Domain)

Reading the Word

Mark 1:29–31 (ESV)

29 And immediately he left the synagogue and entered the house of Simon and Andrew, with James and John. 30 Now Simon’s mother-in-law lay ill with a fever, and immediately they told him about her. 31 And he came and took her by the hand and lifted her up, and the fever left her, and she began to serve them.

Parallel Texts: Matthew 8:14-15; Luke 4:38-39

Understanding and Applying the Word

We read here that Jesus went to the home of Simon and Andrew. He withdrew from the public eye and was in a private setting. We are told that Simon’s mother-in-law was sick with a fever. There are two things to note here. Simon is Peter. Jesus will change his name to Peter later, but that is the name we usually know him by. Also, Peter must have been married, given that he had a mother-in-law.

Jesus went to Peter’s mother-in-law and took her by the hand and lifted her up. Presumably, she was lying down and he helped her to her feet. Immediately, her fever was gone. Jesus had healed her and once again showed his great power and authority.

Notice the response of Peter’s mother-in-law. We are told that she “began to serve them.” The word “serve” in this text is the word that we get “deacon” from, which simply speaks of one who serves. Throughout the New Testament, we read of the great importance of serving others as a response to what God has done for us through Jesus Christ. Peter’s mother-in-law gives us a glowing example of the proper response to God’s grace in our lives. We are called to serve.

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