It Is Better To Be Humble

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Reading the Word

Proverbs 12:9 (ESV)
9 Better to be lowly and have a servant than to play the great m
an and lack bread.

Understanding and Applying the Word

This proverb is all about humilty. So many like to boast and have others think about how great they are. However, it is much better to be humble, even if you have something to boast about, than to pretend you are something you are not. One may be wealthy and powerful and have servants while no one even knows it. Another may boast of his greatness while not even having food to eat. Humility is better than boasting.

Why is it that we feel the need to have others think we are “something”? It is always best to be humble, just as our Savior, who was God incarnate, but came to the world as a servant of mankind.

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Do Not Boast

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Shaped by the Word is a daily Bible reading devotional. I do not publish supplemental devotional material on Sundays, but I do include a suggested Scripture reading for the day. Please subscribe to this page so you can follow along each day as we read through the Book of Psalms in 2018.

Reading the Word

Psalm 75:1–5 (ESV)

1 We give thanks to you, O God; we give thanks, for your name is near. We recount your wondrous deeds. 2 “At the set time that I appoint I will judge with equity. 3 When the earth totters, and all its inhabitants, it is I who keep steady its pillars. Selah 4 I say to the boastful, ‘Do not boast,’ and to the wicked, ‘Do not lift up your horn; 5 do not lift up your horn on high, or speak with haughty neck.’ ”