Who Do You Serve?

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Reading the Word

Luke 12:41–48 (ESV)

41 Peter said, “Lord, are you telling this parable for us or for all?” 42 And the Lord said, “Who then is the faithful and wise manager, whom his master will set over his household, to give them their portion of food at the proper time? 43 Blessed is that servant whom his master will find so doing when he comes. 44 Truly, I say to you, he will set him over all his possessions. 45 But if that servant says to himself, ‘My master is delayed in coming,’ and begins to beat the male and female servants, and to eat and drink and get drunk, 46 the master of that servant will come on a day when he does not expect him and at an hour he does not know, and will cut him in pieces and put him with the unfaithful. 47 And that servant who knew his master’s will but did not get ready or act according to his will, will receive a severe beating. 48 But the one who did not know, and did what deserved a beating, will receive a light beating. Everyone to whom much was given, of him much will be required, and from him to whom they entrusted much, they will demand the more.

Understanding and Applying the Word

Peter wondered if Jesus’ former words (cf. Luke 12:1-40) regarding coveting and readiness were meant for all people or for “us.” By “us”, Peter is most likely referring to the disciples and their roles as leaders. Jesus’ response tells us what he expects of all of his followers; those is leadership and those who are not.

In his response, Jesus uses an illustration of a master who goes away and leaves a servant in charge. To leave a slave in charge while away was quite common practice. However, while the master was away, the servant left in charge beats the other slaves left in his care because he does not think the master will return very soon and he is not concerned with fulfilling his master’s desires. To the servant’s surprise, the master returns unexpectedly and learns what has been taking place. The result is sever punishment. Jesus says this is what it will be like for those who are entrusted with leadership over his people.

Jesus went on to say what it will be like for the other servants who are not in leadership roles. They too will give an account for their service. Those who knew their responsibility and refused to do it will receive a severe beating, while those who did not know and failed to do what was expected will also be punished, but less severely. What does this mean? Those who have been given much will have greater expectations. Those who have been placed in leadership, those who have greater understanding, and those who have been given greater opportunities and resources, will be judged by what they have done with what they have received. Those who have received less will also be judged, but the expectations will be less.

In the end, we must realize that we will all stand before our Lord and we will give an account of what we have done with all he has given us. What have we done with our time, our money, our possessions, our intellect, etc. Have we made the proclamation of the gospel our top priority? Have we fulfilled our leadership roles as those who are stewards of God’s people? Have we sought to spend our lives in the service of our Master so that he will be pleased when he returns to inspect our work? How are we living our lives? Who are we serving?

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